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The Arnhold Collection of Meissen Porcelain at the Frick Collection
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The Arnhold Collection of Meissen Porcelain at the Frick Collection

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The Arnhold Collection of Meissen Porcelain
At the
Frick Collection
(Frick Collection Website)
1 East 70th Street
NYC, NY 10121
212.288.0700

Press: mediarelations@frick.org

March 25, 2008 – June 29, 2008


Dr. Roberta E. Zlokower
March 24, 2008


(Assisted by Frick Collection Press Notes).

Henry Arnhold, a banker in New York, who inherited his parent’s collection of Meissen porcelain, made in Meissen, Germany, near Dresden, has allowed about 100 of his very valuable porcelain pieces to be on exhibit at The Frick Collection. Arnhold has by now doubled the size of his parents’ collection to over 500 porcelain bowls, cups, teapots, figurines, plates, vases, and more. Heinrich and Lisa Arnhold, both deceased, gathered their porcelain in pre-World War II Dresden, preferring the 1710-1750 early Meissen style and technique. In 1709, August II, King of Poland, was patron to Johann Friedrich Böttger, an alchemist, who discovered the mystery in manufacturing Chinese porcelain. Very quickly, in 1710, a royal manufactory was built in Meissen, thus the name of the porcelain that was created there. There was much artistic and sculptural experimentation in the early porcelain, and these pieces are rare and highly prized.

The complete Arnhold Collection was developed in two cities, first by Heinrich and Lisa in Dresden, from 1926-1935, with a preference for vases and tableware, then later by their son, Henry Arnhold, starting in 1972 in New York. The collection, including works from inside and beyond the original manufactory, presents very finely sculpted and drawn theatrical figures and tableware, with royal armor, crossed swords, Chinoiserie, and scenes of nature and of romance. My favorites were figurines of couples in bucolic reverie, a bird cage vase, with gilding and metal, and various teapots, too elegant to imagine using for any purpose, other than for such a special exhibit. The mind wanders, and one could conjecture about the actual 1700’s European scenes, with these porcelain objects in the interiors of refined dining rooms or reception halls. I was truly amazed at the minute care in which The Frick handled the displays, with the tiniest soft prongs to hold up a glazed or golden teapot or tankard cover.

Visit The Arnhold Collection of Meissen Porcelain, 1710-1750, at The Frick Collection, until June 29, 2008, www.frick.org.



Nicolas de Largillière, French (1656-1746).
Augustus the Strong, Elector of Saxony and
King of Poland, ca. 1714-1715
Oil on canvas
57 ½ x 45 ½ inches (146.1 x 115.6 cm)
The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, Kansas
City, Missouri. Purchase: Nelson Trust, 54-35.




Pair of Vases
Meissen porcelain, c.1725–30
1993.291; H: 24 ¾” (63 cm) and 24 1/8” (61.5cm)
The Arnhold Collection
Photo: Maggie Nimkin




Teapot with Cover
Meissen porcelain, Böttger period, c. 1713–15
1928.149; H: 6” (15.2 cm)
The Arnhold Collection
Photo: Maggie Nimkin




Cruet and Mustard Pot
Meissen porcelain, 1737–39
Modeled by Johann Joachim Kändler, 1737
1933.253; H: 7” (17.8 cm);
1933.254: H: 7 ½” (19.1 cm)
The Arnhold Collection
Photo: Maggie Nimkin




Mounted Meissen Group
Meissen porcelain, c. 1728–30
Model attributed to George Fritzsche
Gilt-bronze mounts, probably French
2005.558; H: 6” (15.2 cm)
The Arnhold Collection
Photo: Maggie Nimkin




Bottle and Stopper
Meissen porcelain, c. 1730
2001.447; with stopper, H: 8 ½” (21.6 cm);
without stopper, H: 7 3/8” (18.7 cm)
The Arnhold Collection
Photo: Maggie Nimkin




River God
Meissen porcelain, c. 1740
2003.512; H: 5 ¾” (14.6 cm)
The Arnhold Collection
Photo: Maggie Nimkin




Mounted Tankard
Meissen porcelain, c.1723–24
Decoration attributed to Johann Gregorius
Höroldt, c. 1723–24
Mounted in Augsburg, c. 1725
2004.526; without lid, H: 6 1/8” (15.6 cm);
with lid, H: 7 ¼” (18.5 cm)
The Arnhold Collection
Photo: Maggie Nimkin




Beaker and Saucer
Meissen porcelain, c. 1725–30
Decoration attributed to
Ignaz Bottengruber, c. 1728–30
1992.286; H: 2 3/8” (6 cm);
saucer: D: 4 7/8” (12.4 cm)
The Arnhold Collection
Photo: Maggie Nimkin




Stand
Meissen porcelain, c. 1730
2001.435; Diameter: 10 1/8” (25.8 cm)
The Arnhold Collection
Photo: Maggie Nimkin




Teapot with Cover
Meissen porcelain, c. 1725–30
1995.325; H: 6” (15.2 cm)
Decoration attributed to the Bartholomaus
Seuter Workshop
The Arnhold Collection
Photo: Maggie Nimkin




Teapot
Meissen porcelain, c.1729–31
1996.337; H: 4 7/8” (12.4 cm)
The Arnhold Collection
Photo: Maggie Nimkin




One of a Pair of "Birdcage" Vases
Meissen porcelain, after 1730
2000.416; H: 20 ¼” (51.4 cm)
The Arnhold Collection
Photo: Maggie Nimkin




Pantalone and Columbine
Meissen porcelain, c. 1740
Modeled by Johann Joachim Kändler, 1736–38;
2006.582; H: 6 5/8 in. (17 cm)
The Arnhold Collection
Photo: Maggie Nimkin




One of Two Musicians, Called Malabars
Meissen porcelain, c. 1750
Modeled by Friedrich Elias Meyer, 1748–49;
2006.590; H: 13 in. (33 cm)
The Arnhold Collection
Photo: Maggie Nimkin




For more information, contact Dr. Roberta E. Zlokower at zlokower@bestweb.net