Roberta on the Arts
"Italian Women in Jazz" Features Roberta Gambarini at Blue Note
Home
Contact Roberta
Jazz and Cabaret Corner
On Location with Roberta
In the Galleries: Artists and Photographers
Backstage with the Playwrights and Filmmakers
Classical and Cultural Connections
New CDs
Arts and Education
Onstage with the Dancers
Offstage with the Dancers
Upcoming Events
Special Events
Memorable Misadventures
Mailbag
Our Sponsors

"Italian Women in Jazz" Features Roberta Gambarini at Blue Note

- Jazz and Cabaret Corner

Two Village Landmarks for Northern Italian Cuisine

Villa Mosconi Restaurant
www.VillaMosconi.com
69 MacDougal Street
New York, NY 10012
212.673.0390
Open 12 noon - 11 PM
Closed Sundays

Monte's Trattoria
www.MontesTrattoriaNYC.com
97 MacDougal Street
New York, NY 10012
212.228.9194
Open 12 noon - 11 PM, Sun., Mon., Wed., Thurs.
Open 12 noon - 11:30 PM, Fri., Sat. Closed Tuesdays.

Enzo Capua and Italian Government Tourist Board
Present Italian Women in Jazz:
Roberta Gambarini Trio
With
Roberta Gambarini – vocals
(Roberta Gambarini Website)
Gerald Clayton – piano
Willie Jones, III- drums
Neil Swainson - bass
Guest: Ada Rovatti - sax

At
Blue Note
131 West 3rd Street at Sixth Ave.
NYC, NY
212.475.8592
www.bluenotejazz.com

General Manager: Tom Bailey
Media Contact: Jonathan Kantor
jk@bluenote.net

Dr. Roberta E. Zlokower
February 2, 2008


On the second night of this three-night Italian Women in Jazz Festival, Enzo Capua and the Italian Government Tourism Board presented the Roberta Gambarini Trio. Ms. Gambarini brought with her the hot, new pianist, Gerald Clayton, son of bassist, John Clayton, and nephew of saxophonist, Jeff Clayton. Also on board tonight were Willie Jones, III on drums, Neil Swainson on bass, and special guest, Ada Rovatti on saxophone. The band opened with “You’d Be So Easy to Love”, with Swainson on bass, Clayton’s soft piano, and Ms. Gambarini’s swinging vocals. The song built to full momentum, as Ms. Gambarini added scat, just at the moment I anticipated it. Jones’ drums enhanced Swainson’s bass (Swainson is known as bassist for George Shearing). “Deep Purple” was next, introduced by clear unaccompanied vocals, before Ada Rovatti joined the band, mid-song. She took a melodic riff, before Swainson’s sultry solo. When Ms. Gambarini shared her microphone with Ms. Rovatti, the languorous sax merged with vivacious vocals.

“Lush Life” followed, with Ms. Gambarini drawing out each note as a true torch singer. Seamlessly, the subsequent song began in scat, with Jones building a Brazilian Samba rhythm. The buoyant ballad was sung in English, and Jones kept the mood in Rio. Gerald Clayton was soon featured in “No More Blues”, and this youthful pianist is an artist to watch, for his spontaneous improvisations and driven chords. Music from the film, “Cinema Paradiso”, was crooned in English, and the romantic lyrics faded across the Club’s expanse. Swainson was featured in a luminescent spotlight, as one song soon meshed into the next. “On the Sunny Side of the Street” brought Ms. Rovatti back onstage, and Ms. Gambarini created scat, as she remembered a record that belonged to her father. Ms. Rovatti added a rambunctious riff, reinforcing the melody, before Clayton brought the theme to a virtuosic zone. “Porgy, I’s Your Woman Now”, from Porgy and Bess, showcased Ms. Gambarini’s wide vocal range. “Lover Come Back to Me” offered Ms. Rovatti a generous solo that picked up the pace, just as drums and vocals merged into a mesmerizing duo. Clayton seized the moment and added joyful jive, followed by Ms. Gambarini’s scat and Jones’ rhythms. The song was sizzling, as each artist fed off the others’ energy.

Duke Ellington’s music was next, with “Multicolored Blue” in bluesy refrains. Toward the finale of this second set, Ms. Gambarini chose the Italian ballad, “Estate”. The presentation was almost a cappella, with a hint of piano introduction prior to a piano-vocal duo. A clavé rhythm, with brassy accents, drove the punctuated and percussive tempo. Ms. Gambarini mimicked a muted trumpet, as she made the most of her microphone and versatility. To close the set, each artist took a riff, before the full band merged in a final flourish.



Roberta Gambarini on Vocals
Photo Courtesy of Roberta E. Zlokower



Ada Rovatti on Sax
Photo Courtesy of Roberta E. Zlokower



Roberta Gambarini
Photo Courtesy of Roberta E. Zlokower



Neil Swenson on Bass
Photo Courtesy of Roberta E. Zlokower



Gerald Clayton on Piano
Photo Courtesy of Roberta E. Zlokower



Ada Rovatti
Photo Courtesy of Roberta E. Zlokower



Neil Swenson and Ada Rovatti
Photo Courtesy of Roberta E. Zlokower



Ada Rovatti
Photo Courtesy of Roberta E. Zlokower



Roberta Gambarini
Photo Courtesy of Roberta E. Zlokower



Roberta Gambarini
Photo Courtesy of Roberta E. Zlokower



Roberta Gambarini
Photo Courtesy of Roberta E. Zlokower



Willie Jones, III, Drummer at Leisure
Photo Courtesy of Roberta E. Zlokower



Charlie and Mark, Blue Note Management
Photo Courtesy of Roberta E. Zlokower





For more information, contact Dr. Roberta E. Zlokower at zlokower@bestweb.net