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Fernando Otero Quintet
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Fernando Otero Quintet

- Classical and Cultural

Music Reviews

Fernando Otero Quintet
www.fernandootero.com

CD Release Concert
X-Tango
PLAN
www.X-Tango.com
www.twinzrecords.com

Fernando Otero, Composer and Piano
Hector del Curto, Bandoneón
Nick Danielson, Violin
John DeCesare, Double Bass
Leo Grinhauz, Violoncello

At
The Argentine Consulate
(Website)
12 West 56th Street, NY, NY 10019
212.603.0440

Dr. Roberta E. Zlokower
January 9, 2004

(See Reviews of More Concerts at the Argentine Consulate). In a brief, but extremely dynamic concert at the majestic, Argentine Consulate, Fernando Otero, the hot, new musician on the international Tango/Jazz scene, who performs both for listening and dancing, showcased his Quartet and new CD, X-Tango: PLAN, which includes an internal video as well as twelve superb tracks. (See CD Review of X-Tango: Plan). Four pieces were presented tonight, three composed by Otero, and the first opened with Otero’s escalating, edgy, and electrically charged piano arrangement, added to Leo Grinhauz’ deeply resonant violoncello and John DeCesare’s double bass. The second piece, with Greenhouse’s violoncello lead, followed by Hector del Curto’s vibrant bandoneon, merged into a melancholy passage, provided by Nick Danielson’s exotic violin. There was a distinctive Bohemian and au courant motif to this music.

The third piece appeared to be the quintessential Tango performance piece, and I imagined sultry, sensational Tango performers onstage at the Consulate. Danielson has mastered new and unusual violin effects, and Grinhauz was not far behind with similar New-Tango creations. The repetitive refrains seemed to symbolize power and possession. The final piece, You Must Believe in Spring, by Michel Legrand and Jacques Demy, opened with a romantic and evocative bandoneón, to be followed by a lovely Parisian image, as piano and double bass performed a duet to the whisper of strings, before the bandoneón merged once more. This work could be choreographed for ballet, even as it ended with a hint of Tango.


Hector del Curto, Bandoneon
Photo courtesy of Roberta E. Zlokower




Fernando Otero, Piano
Photo courtesy of Roberta E. Zlokower




Leo Grinhauz, Cello
Photo courtesy of Roberta E. Zlokower




Nick Danielson, Violin
Photo courtesy of Roberta E. Zlokower




Nick Danielson, Violin
Photo courtesy of Roberta E. Zlokower




Hector del Curto and Nick Danielson
Photo courtesy of Roberta E. Zlokower




John DeCesare, Bass
Photo courtesy of Roberta E. Zlokower




Judy and Jon (www.tangomas.com)
Photo courtesy of Roberta E. Zlokower




Dardo Lucero, Filmmaker
Photo courtesy of Roberta E. Zlokower




Deputy Consul General Luis Pablo Maria Beltramino and Judy
Photo courtesy of Roberta E. Zlokower




Consulate Reception
Photo courtesy of Roberta E. Zlokower




Consulate Reception
Photo courtesy of Roberta E. Zlokower




Consulate Reception
Photo courtesy of Roberta E. Zlokower




Consulate Reception
Photo courtesy of Roberta E. Zlokower




Consulate Reception
Photo courtesy of Roberta E. Zlokower




Fernando Otero
Photo courtesy of Roberta E. Zlokower




Hector and Fernando
Photo courtesy of Roberta E. Zlokower




Hector and Friend
Photo courtesy of Roberta E. Zlokower




Consulate Reception
Photo courtesy of Roberta E. Zlokower




Mariana and Hector (See Mariana at Tanguardia, www.thaliatheatre.org)
Photo courtesy of Roberta E. Zlokower




Hector and Ellen Azorin (www.cantaloupeproductions.com)
Photo courtesy of Roberta E. Zlokower




Leo Grinhauz
Photo courtesy of Roberta E. Zlokower


For more information, contact Dr. Roberta E. Zlokower at zlokower@bestweb.net