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Mood Indigo: The Legacy of Duke Ellington
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Mood Indigo: The Legacy of Duke Ellington

- In the Galleries: Artists

Michael Rosenfeld Gallery
www.michaelrosenfeldart.com

24 West 57th Street
NY, NY 10019
212.247.0082

Mood Indigo:
The Legacy of Duke Ellington
A Look at Jazz and Improvisation in American Art

(See Ellington Bio)
May 21-July 30

Publicity: Carolyn McClair Public Relations
info@CarolynMcClairPR.com

Dr. Roberta E. Zlokower
June 7, 2004

This is a first in a series of music-related art: Michael Rosenfeld Gallery was founded in 1989 and specializes in twentieth century art. In the past fifteen years, the diversity in American art has been explored in ninety exhibitions. This exhibition, Mood Indigo: The Legacy of Duke Ellington, is the first that brings together jazz and art. Jazz has always had a universal appeal, and jazz inspired visual artists to seek and find aesthetic freedom. Some of these artists were Lee Krasner, Franz Kline, Stuart Davis, and Romare Bearden, who created rhythm and mood in their paintings. One jazz artist, who strongly contributed to American visual art, during the twentieth century, was Duke Ellington, composer, pianist, and King of Jazz. (Publicity Notes).

On sale along with the exhibition paintings of Mood Indigo: The Legacy of Duke Ellington is the white baby grand Kramer piano that belonged to Duke Ellington, and upon which he composed his classics between 1928 and the late 1950’s. Duke Ellington composed Harlem, In a Sentimental Mood, Sophisticated Lady, and Caravan on this beautiful, historical piano, which graced the homes of Duke Ellington, Ruth Ellington, Duke’s sister, and Stephen James, Ellington’s nephew. (Gallery Notes).

Mr. James is pleased to allow Michael Rosenfeld Gallery to sell this piano to an art institution or collector or Ellington fan. The piano has a $1,000,000 value and will be available to view and/or purchase throughout the exhibition. "halley k. harrisburg”, Director of Michael Rosenfeld Gallery, says that this piano is unlike other exhibited pieces but is a great work of art. She looks forward to facilitating this unique piano sale. (Gallery Notes).

Also on sale are vintage photographs by Gjon Mili (1902-1980) and Gordon Parks (b. 1912), as well as Egyptian Blue Glaze Jazz Bowl (1931) by Victor Schreckengost (b. 1906). There are a variety of gouaches on board, watercolors on board and paper, collages, gelatin silver prints, oils on canvas, and other combinations of art media. The exhibition checklist can be found below the photographs. (Gallery Notes).

In a pre-exhibition interview (May 6, 2004) with Michael Rosenfeld and halley k. harrisburg, I was told that Romare Bearden, artist exhibited in Mood Indigo, contacted them about the prospective sale of Ellington’s piano and said that it was time for this piano to be seen and shared. Harrisburg says, “At this point, the piano has been climate-controlled and preserved in an ideal world. It has an incredible aura. This is the only piano Ellington composed on. He bought it in 1929 as a used piano. It was a Kramer, made between 1915 and 1918, from the Gilbert Piano Co. in Boston”.

Rosenfeld and harrisburg are particularly supportive of African-American artists, and one half of the artists represented in Mood Indigo are African-American, and half are white, all of whom were influenced by the world of jazz. They discussed Gordon Parks and Gjon Mili, who created vintage photographs of Ellington between the 1920’s to the mid 1970’s. According to Rosenfeld and harrisburg, the Cathedral of St. John the Divine and Interfaith Center Church were given pianos by the Ellington family.

Rosenfeld and harrisburg expect a mixed audience of arts enthusiasts from the jazz and visual art community to view this rare exhibition and this extremely rare piano, on which Duke Ellington composed Mood Indigo. The May 6, 2004 photos were taken on the day of the interview with Michael Rosenfeld and halley. k. harrisburg. The May 20, 2004 photos were taken on the night of the Opening Reception for this exhibit, which includes Ellington’s piano.



Exhibition Checklist

1. Charmion von Wiegand (1898-1983), The Red Square, 1964, gouache on board, 14 3/8 x 14 3/8 inches, signed

2. Burgoyne Diller (1906-1965), Third Theme, 1938-39, collage and watercolor on board, 15 x 15 inches, signed

3. Norman Lewis (1909-1979), Jazz Club, 1945, oil on canvas, 22 ¾ x 34 ½ inches, signed

4. Lee Krasner (1908-1984), Untitled, 1948, oil on canvas, 42 1/8 x 21 1/8 inches, signed

5. Eldzier Cortor (b.1916), On Tour, 1997, oil on canvas, 35 x 31 inches, signed

6. Archibald J. Motley, Jr. (1891-1981), Nightclub, c.1935, oil on canvas, 20 x 22 inches, signed

7. Jan Matulka (1890-1972), Jazz Band, c.1925, watercolor on paper, 24 x 18 inches

8. Romare Bearden (1912-1988), Of the Blues: Kansas City 4/4, 1974, collage on board, 44 x 50 inches, signed

9. Hans Hofmann (1880-1966), Composition No. 9, 1953, oil on canvas, 38 x 30 inches, signed

10. Norman Lewis (1909-1979), Pink Boogie, 1975, oil on canvas, 54 x 78 inches, signed

11. Gjon Mili (1902-1980), Jam Session: Edward Duke Ellington plays his own Composition “Don’t Get Around Much Anymore”, 1943, vintage gelatin silver print, 13 ¼ x 10 ½ inches, Life Photo photographer’s stamp

12. Gjon Mili (1902-1980), Jam Session: 2nd Jam (wide shot), 1944, vintage gelatin silver print,10 5/8 x13 3/8 inches, photographer’s stamp

13. Gjon Mili (1902-1980), Jam Session: Duke Ellington, 1943, vintage gelatin silver print,11 ¾ x 10 ½ inches, photographer’s stamp

14. Stuart Davis (1894-1964), Rhythm (a.k.a. Jazz/George Wettling), 1947, black ink, gouache and graphite on paper, 9 x 11 ¼ inches

15. Franz Kline (1910-1962), Untitled, c.1958-59, black ink and collage on paper, 11 ½ x 9 3/8 inches, signed

16. Victor Schreckengost (b.1906), Egyptian Blue Glaze Jazz Bowl, 1931, glazed ceramic manufactured by Cowan Pottery Studio, 8 ¼ x 13 ¾ x 13 ¾ inches, signed

17. Alma Thomas (1891-1978), Bluets, 1973, acrylic on canvas, 26 x 36 inches, signed

18. Norman Bluhm (1921-1999), Open Hearth, 1960, oil on canvas, 60 ¼ x 48 inches, signed

19. Romare Bearden (1912-1988), Instruments of Dixieland (aka Intermission Still-Life), 1975, collage and acrylic on board, 28 x 22 inches, signed

20. George Wettling (1906-1968), Jazz Is In, c.1949, oil on canvas, 22 x 30 ¼ inches

21. William H. Johnson (1901-1970), Jitterbugs III, c.1941, pochoir on paper, 17 ½ x 11 ¼ inches

22. Charmion von Wiegand (1898-1983), Night Environment Manhattan, 1946-49, oil on canvas,30 x 25 inches, signed

23. Ilya Bolotowsky (1907-1981), First Rhomboid Column, 1976, acrylic on wood, 95 ½ x 19 x 12 inches, signed

24. Gordon Parks (b.1912), Duke Ellington Recording Session, 1960, vintage gelatin silver print,13 ¼ x 8 7/8 inches, signed

25. Gordon Parks (b.1912), Duke Ellington in Concert, New York, 1960, vintage gelatin silver print,9 ½ x 13 5/16, signed

26. Gordon Parks (b.1912), Duke Ellington in Concert, New York, 1960, vintage gelatin silver print,9 ¼ x 13 1/8 inches, signed

27. Gordon Parks (b.1912), Duke Ellington Recording Session, Los Angeles, c.1960, vintage gelatin silver print, 10 ¼ x 13 ½ inches, signed

28. Gordon Parks (b.1912), Duke Ellington Recording Session, Los Angeles, 1960, vintage gelatin silver print, 10 x 13 3/8 inches, signed

29. Gordon Parks (b.1912), Duke Ellington and Billy Strayhorn at the screening of “Anatomy of a Murder”, c.1960, vintage gelatin silver print, 13 3/8 x 9 ¾ inches, signed


North Office:
Beauford Delaney (1901-1979), Untitled, 1960, oil on canvas, 51 x 38 inches, signed

South Office:
Miguel Covarrubias (1904-1957), Jazz Baby, c.1925, graphite, crayon and watercolor on paper,
11 x 8 7/16 inches, signed


Mood Indigo: The Legacy of Duke Ellington Exhibit
Photo courtesy of Roberta E. Zlokower



halley k. harrisburg and Michael Rosenfeld in their Gallery
Photo courtesy of Roberta E. Zlokower



Mood Indigo: The Legacy of Duke Ellington Exhibit
Photo courtesy of Roberta E. Zlokower



Mood Indigo: The Legacy of Duke Ellington Exhibit
Photo courtesy of Roberta E. Zlokower



Mood Indigo: The Legacy of Duke Ellington Exhibit
Photo courtesy of Roberta E. Zlokower



Rosenfeld Gallery Reception
Photo courtesy of Roberta E. Zlokower



Rosenfeld Gallery Reception
Photo courtesy of Roberta E. Zlokower



Rosenfeld Gallery Reception
Photo courtesy of Roberta E. Zlokower



Mood Indigo: The Legacy of Duke Ellington Exhibit
Photo courtesy of Roberta E. Zlokower



Mood Indigo: The Legacy of Duke Ellington Exhibit
Photo courtesy of Roberta E. Zlokower



Mood Indigo: The Legacy of Duke Ellington Exhibit
Photo courtesy of Roberta E. Zlokower



Mood Indigo: The Legacy of Duke Ellington Exhibit
Photo courtesy of Roberta E. Zlokower



Mood Indigo: The Legacy of Duke Ellington Exhibit
Photo courtesy of Roberta E. Zlokower



Mood Indigo: The Legacy of Duke Ellington Exhibit
Photo courtesy of Roberta E. Zlokower



Mood Indigo: The Legacy of Duke Ellington Exhibit
Photo courtesy of Roberta E. Zlokower



Mood Indigo: The Legacy of Duke Ellington Exhibit
Photo courtesy of Roberta E. Zlokower



Duke Ellington Piano
Photo courtesy of Roberta E. Zlokower



Duke Ellington Piano
Photo courtesy of Roberta E. Zlokower



Duke Ellington Piano
Photo courtesy of Roberta E. Zlokower



Duke Ellington Piano
Photo courtesy of Roberta E. Zlokower



Duke Ellington Piano
Photo courtesy of Roberta E. Zlokower



Mood Indigo: The Legacy of Duke Ellington Exhibit
Photo courtesy of Roberta E. Zlokower



Mood Indigo: The Legacy of Duke Ellington Exhibit
Photo courtesy of Roberta E. Zlokower



Mood Indigo: The Legacy of Duke Ellington Exhibit
Photo courtesy of Roberta E. Zlokower



Rosenfeld Gallery Reception
Photo courtesy of Roberta E. Zlokower



Michael Rosenfeld on Right
Photo courtesy of Roberta E. Zlokower



Rosenfeld Gallery Reception
Photo courtesy of Roberta E. Zlokower



halley k. harrisburg and Guests
Photo courtesy of Roberta E. Zlokower



Rosenfeld Gallery Reception
Photo courtesy of Roberta E. Zlokower



Rosenfeld Gallery Reception
Photo courtesy of Roberta E. Zlokower



Mood Indigo: The Legacy of Duke Ellington Exhibit
Photo courtesy of Roberta E. Zlokower



Stephen James on Left
Photo courtesy of Roberta E. Zlokower



Carolyn McClair
Photo courtesy of Roberta E. Zlokower



Mood Indigo: The Legacy of Duke Ellington Exhibit
Photo courtesy of Roberta E. Zlokower


For more information, contact Dr. Roberta E. Zlokower at zlokower@bestweb.net