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Wycliffe Gordon's Septet at Dizzy's Club Coca-Cola in an Afternoon Concert
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Wycliffe Gordon's Septet at Dizzy's Club Coca-Cola in an Afternoon Concert

- Jazz and Cabaret Corner

Wycliffe Gordon's Septet
Free Afternoon Concert
A Preview of "Music of New Orleans"
Prior to a Debut Tour in South Africa
at
Dizzy's Club Coca-Cola
Frederick P. Rose Hall
Jazz at Lincoln Center
www.jalc.org
Media: Scott Thompson and Dana Barden

With:
Wycliffe Gordon, trombone
Mark Braud, trumpet
Lawrence Ketchins, tuba
Roderick Paulin, saxophone
Doreen Ketchins, clarinet
Herlin Riley, drums
Shannon Powell, drums

Dr. Roberta E. Zlokower
May 9, 2006

Wycliffe Gordon's Septet, led by Wycliffe on trombone, and a New Orleans jazz ensemble on two sizes of drums, clarinet, sax, tuba, and trumpet, presented a free concert to a standing-room-only crowd at Dizzy's Club Coca-Cola this afternoon. The Septet was previewing its upcoming tour to South Africa, in collaboration with the Field Band Foundation. The tour is sponsored by the U.S. Department of State's Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs. This exchange program will use jazz performance and education as vehicles to advance HIV/AIDS awareness and prevention among youth.

The Septet literally performed like every New Orleans Marching Band that I have ever heard, with songs about Mardi Gras, accompanied by whistling, singing, drum rolls, marching through the audience, and onstage repartee. Each musician, it seemed, took a turn singing at the mike, and their voices were as splendid as their musicianship. Doreen Ketchins plays a mean clarinet, and she sang with sensational soul. The intensity and interest of this music was apparent, as the fans moved rhythmically in their seats. There were drum and bugle corps works, as well as church gospels and funeral music. Just a Closer Walk included a muffled bass drum with a drum roll and vocals from the second percussionist. The sax enhanced the moment with a lovely melody.

Down By the Riverside brought the audience into the mix, with syncopated clapping and Wycliffe's vocals, and there were smiles all around. When the drums and tuba were featured together, I almost wanted to dance. One drum was showcased with sparkling metal sounds, and everyone clapped along, once more. Lil' Liza Jane had humor and innuendo, and the band was obviously enjoying the moment as much as was the audience. An obvious favorite, When the Saints Go Marching In closed the program, as the Septet marched around the Club and out through the door. Wycliffe Gordon's Septet should be greeted warmly in South Africa on the upcoming tour.



Wycliffe Gordon Marching Band
Photo courtesy of Ayano Hisa / Jazz at Lincoln Center



Wycliffe Gordon Marching Band
Photo courtesy of Ayano Hisa / Jazz at Lincoln Center



Wycliffe Gordon Marching Band
Photo courtesy of Ayano Hisa / Jazz at Lincoln Center



Wycliffe Gordon Marching Band
Photo courtesy of Ayano Hisa / Jazz at Lincoln Center



Wycliffe Gordon Marching Band
Photo courtesy of Ayano Hisa / Jazz at Lincoln Center



Wycliffe Gordon Marching Band
Photo courtesy of Ayano Hisa / Jazz at Lincoln Center




For more information, contact Dr. Roberta E. Zlokower at zlokower@bestweb.net