Roberta on the Arts
The Cedar Walton Quartet at Dizzy's Club "Coca-Cola"
Home
Contact Roberta
Jazz and Cabaret Corner
On Location with Roberta
In the Galleries: Artists and Photographers
Backstage with the Playwrights and Filmmakers
Classical and Cultural Connections
New CDs
Arts and Education
Onstage with the Dancers
Offstage with the Dancers
Upcoming Events
Special Events
Memorable Misadventures
Mailbag
Our Sponsors

The Cedar Walton Quartet at Dizzy's Club "Coca-Cola"

- Jazz and Cabaret

Joseph Patelson Music House


160 West 56th Street
New York, NY 10019
212-582-5840
www.patelson.com

Cedar Walton Quartet
(Cedar Walton Web Page)
Cedar Walton, Piano
Lewis Nash, Drums
Vincent Herring, Saxophone
David Williams, Bass

At
Frederick P. Rose Hall
Dizzy’s Club Coca-Cola
Broadway at 60th Street
NY, NY
212.258.9595
(Dizzy’s Club Coca-Cola Website)
Todd Barkan, Programming Director 
Scott Thompson, Press



Dr. Roberta E. Zlokower
August 3, 2008


Cedar Walton took his Quartet to Dizzy’s Club Coca-Cola, and Vincent Herring was showcased early, in “Hindsight”, with fluid sax flourishes. Herring created a theme from the rhythms of David Williams, on bass, and Lewis Nash, on drums. But, it was the lead musician, Cedar Walton, who drove the Steinway through the repetitive tones. Rapid rippling refrains formed Walton’s theme, finished musically by Herring. “Dear Ruth”, Walton’s tribute to his mother, was warm and embracing, replete with artistic emotion. Nash used his brushes to swish softly in the background, while Walton continued in melancholy fashion, taking long breaks for Herring’s soaring sax. When Walton and Herring merged, elongated, echoing notes danced along the keyboard.

“Martha’s Prize”, for Martha Walton, was introduced by Walton, with each piano phrase extended for emphasis. This persuasive theme was faster than the previous one, with fused sax-bass-drums, in contrast to Walton’s interpretive piano that added a bouncy tempo. “Sixth Avenue” was the Quartet’s most vibrant and contemporary piece, with Herring going wild with atonal brass. Frenetic, hopping musicality was evident here, with Nash adding a clavé beat on his drums, and Herring repeating two notes in sequence to the band’s full fusion. Stevie Wonder’s “Another Star” had a slow lead into its clavé motif, and Herring was again featured with his extreme skill – seamless, breathless, and melodic. The tone turned mystical and mesmerizing, with Latin-inspired styling.

“Somewhere”, now showcasing solo piano riffs, was melancholy and serene, with Walton adding interpretive grace and spontaneity, amidst pregnant pauses. The final work of the set built from clavé to charismatic, and Williams was busy on bass. Herring took the lead, with Walton, Williams, and Nash providing rolling rhythms. The sound was first buoyant and bubbly, then rolling through the Club with increasing thunder. Herring called it a night with one definitive and driven note. Check the Dizzy’s Club Coca-Cola Website for future dates and artists.


Cedar Walton Quartet
Courtesy Of Roberta E. Zlokower




David Williams on Bass
Lewis Nash on Drums
Courtesy Of Roberta E. Zlokower




Cedar Walton on Piano
Courtesy Of Roberta E. Zlokower




Cedar Walton Quartet
Courtesy Of Roberta E. Zlokower




Vincent Herring on Sax
Courtesy Of Roberta E. Zlokower




David Williams and Lewis Nash
Courtesy Of Roberta E. Zlokower




Cedar Walton on Piano
Courtesy Of Roberta E. Zlokower




David Williams and Lewis Nash
Courtesy Of Roberta E. Zlokower




David Williams and Lewis Nash
Courtesy Of Roberta E. Zlokower




Vincent Herring, David Williams,
Lewis Nash
Courtesy Of Roberta E. Zlokower




David Williams and Lewis Nash
Courtesy Of Roberta E. Zlokower




Cedar Walton and His Daughter at Leisure
Courtesy Of Roberta E. Zlokower






For more information, contact Dr. Roberta E. Zlokower at zlokower@bestweb.net